Features

January 2012 Issue

Left, this Piper Navajo simulator deployed by SimCom Training Centers helps reduce training costs while allowing pilots to experience emergencies and other procedures that otherwise would be too dangerous to practice in the actual airplane.

The Training Mix

Advances in technologies and regulations mean the best mix of airplanes, simulators and other resources also is changing and will enhance your training.

In recent years, the general aviation community has complained our activity has grown too complicated and, as a result, applicants for the private pilot certificate now average about 70 or so hours before passing a checkride. Yes, aviation has gotten more complicated, but we should question the notion it takes that many hours in an airplane to become a competent private pilot. A corollary is that existing practices also can be improved to benefit existing pilots and enhance their recurrent training experience.

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