Features

April 2019 Issue

Survive Inadvertent IMC The Old-Fashioned Way

In 1954, researchers published a simple, reliable technique for escaping IMC. The aerodynamics havenít changed, but the tools and training have.

if youíve been around general aviation for any time at all, by now you should not be surprised to learn that attempted VFR flight into instrument metereological conditions (IMC) and its close cousin, loss of visual references at night, consistently rank as the most lethal type of GA accidents. Although the numbers (thank goodness!) have recently begun to decline, about seven out of every eightónearly 90 percentóof those accidents are still fatal. Thatís largely because, as current NTSB Vice Chairman Bruce Landsberg puts it, they tend to end in flight into terrain, either controlled or (more often) uncontrolled. In both cases, prospects for survival are meager.

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